Free Download WordPress Themes and plugins.

Collaring

Our research team successfully succeeded in collaring the first lion in the Mara Triangle. An adult female from the Olololo pride, aka Angama pride, was targeted, as we are aware that this pride ventures outside areas of protection. 


Pride members have previously disappeared from this pride and we suspect that the cause has been due to human-lion conflicts. Information from this collar will help to reduce such conflicts in the future. We sincerely thank Angama Safari Foundation for funding this collar and the collaring operation, and the Mara Triangle and KWS for their support.

Wild Dogs

Following reports from local herders on wild dog sightings with a pack of 11 wild dogs, we set up camera traps around the old wild dog den in Lemek hills, Mara North Conservancy.

We were able to capture pictures of the pack that is usually roaming around that area which consists of four adults and nine puppies. Not so long ago, Anthony Risancho, who is in charge of wild dogs study, witnessed a hunt that involved the pack. They are known to hunt either at dawn or dusk and normally chase the prey until it tires. This was evident from some of the footage we got from him since the wild dogs were lucky to have eventually attacked and devoured the meal. 

Camera Traps

Camera traps have been a useful tool in the monitoring and evaluation of patterns which would normally be impossible to undertake in certain conditions. In order to prevent further conflicts, we deployed camera traps on the bomas in Rekero & Olkurroto areas to ascertain which predators are responsible for the attacks. This is due to an increase in the number of predator attacks on livestock in the areas. 

The data collected by the camera traps will help us together with other conservation partners and authorities to come up with measures to deter the attacks. 

We have also given the communities directions on how to reinforce their existing bomas to prevent further attacks. You too can play a part in protecting the predators.

Wildlife clubs

Our community team has been busy in the field with wildlife club members. They got to visit some of them at Irbaan Primary School where they were attending the club kitchen garden. Through this, the wildlife club members are empowered to be responsible and learn better ways of being productive and also responsible in their households. Given the uncertainty with school resumption, they’re also able to help their parents at home when they are not studying.

Following the gradual reopening of schools after the  COVID-19 occasioned closure, we started taking neighboring club members to Maasai Mara Game Reserve. This year’s edition of the annual trip to conservation areas had a goal of getting 100 of them from 5 villages bordering the game reserve. We’re happy to have achieved this and the excitement from our wildlife club members has been overwhelmingly positive. We would like to thank WWF Kenya for their support in enabling them to get this experience.

Lion Ambassadors

We held our first review of our Lion Ambassadors Program. This consists of community members with whom we engage in matters involving lions, conflict mitigation mechanisms, and the need for coexistence. We had lion ambassadors from 10 zones where we discussed the progress towards achieving the objectives of the program.

They have had commendable recognition from their areas of operation and have assisted us in mitigating and responding to Human-Wildlife conflicts. 

One of the main objectives of the program is to promote the co-existence of people, lions, and other predators. Since the program started six months ago, we have witnessed increased tolerance to predators by communities and reduced instances of conflict.

The data collected by the camera traps will help us together with other conservation partners and authorities to come up with measures to deter the attacks. 

We have also given the communities directions on how to reinforce their existing bomas to prevent further attacks. You too can play a part in protecting the predators.